Are you a mom? About half of you said “no.” (See statistics at end of this blog.) Are you an aunt? Most of you probably said ‘YES!’ An ABR (Aunt By Relation) or an ABC (Aunt By Choice), women often are blessed with nieces and nephews to love and enjoy.

Our podcast guest loves being an aunt! She love the experience so much she started Savvy Auntie – the first online community for aunts. Meet MELANIE NOTKIN, aka: Auntie Melanie.

Auntie Melanie Notkin of the Savvy Auntie

Melanie is a former interactive and print beauty editor and former interactive marketing and communications executive for global Fortune 500 companies. When Melanie first became an Auntie in 2001, she found herself concerned by the lack of modern resources for Aunties – an important and growing segment of American women, especially those yet to have children of their own, having children later in life, or opting out of motherhood altogether. After interviewing dozens of Aunties, she understood that with an authentic love for children and discretionary buy valium online without prescription income, these modern Aunts had the potential to become Savvy Aunties and put their time and money where their heart is.

As girlfriends, we’re often ‘aunt’ to our friends’ children. Listen in as Auntie Melanie shares her enthusiasm for aunts and the resources we can find on her site to be a great aunt, whether an ABR or ABC! Thanks Melanie!

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Facts from SavvyAuntie.com:

Women without children: 45%*
*This fertility data does not include women over 45 whose fertility is greatly diminished. We surmise therefore that the total number of women without children is well over 50%, and over 25% of the entire adult population.

Childlessness is a fast growing factor among American women:
2004: 45%
2003: 44%
2001: 43%

Women are getting married later, if ever:
Median age for marriage for a woman in 1980: 20.8
Median age for marriage for a woman in 2005: 25.8
Single Women, Never Married in 2006: 26%

Even marriage does not ensure a family:
Married couples without children in 2006: 43%